Get in touch

Hello! Feel free to get in touch…

  • Drop me an email: daisy [at] daisydumas.com
  • Follow me on Instagram and Twitter: @daisydumas
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Comments
14 Responses to “Get in touch”
  1. daffy says:

    so – here we are, I’ve read your website and some of your yarns. very fancy schmancy – but in a good way.
    this phrase is gold, and graphic, Dais: “An alien stench lingers over whole swathes of the city – what is causing that fishy, metallic smell? – and in areas most badly affected, fridges and freezers of rotting meat and food are adding to the mighty pong.”
    this a GREAT example of one of the small things everyone knows, but that the journos often fail to remind the public in a large “disaster” news story.
    a lot of the journos arrive and after a day or so, when it comes time for them to file or go live, they’ve got used to the smell so they forget to mention it.
    just about the worst example of this happened in Poland/Austria when the allies freed the concentration camps. many of the surrounding farmers had no idea what was going on in the camps, such was the security in and around the camps. during liberation many of those same farmers were shot by distraught and pissed off allied soldiers who refused to believe they farmers couldn’t “smell” what was going on and therefore, should have done something to try and stop it…true story.
    anyways…rock on – smell those yarns out! lol!
    cheers,
    daffy

  2. Cosima says:

    Hi Daisy, my father sent me this. Hello from an old Sandkastenfreundin! I wish you all the best for your life in down-under. If you still understand any German, check out my blog!

  3. Claudette Provencal says:

    Was very intrigued with the air nap footage. Do you know where I can find
    more info on this bed…..I have a 21 year old son with autism – I’m sure this
    would help with his sensory needs. Can you help?

    Thank you so much. (Mother from rural Canada)

  4. nelliemayfare says:

    Great articles-usually read most sites like Jared, Perez, Lainey. . .-love your writing

  5. Tom Ferris says:

    Dear Ms. Dumas,

    Good morning, I’m writing you regarding a photo in a piece you wrote for the Daily Mail regarding Women war workers in WWII 5 Sept. 2011 the third picture down the page pictures four women working on a tank. One of the women in the photo is a dead ringer for my mother I know she did work around Tanks during the war and I would like to get more information about the photo. The caption states it was taken in Maryland at the proving grounds and as far as I know my mother was never there but did work at the tank factory in Detroit. I would be most grateful for any information that you may be able to provide.

    Thank you and best regards, Tom Ferris

    PS I really enjoyed reading the article.

    • daisy dumas says:

      Hi Tom, thanks for getting in touch. I think it might be best to contact the source of the photos, is there a credit attached? I left the DM a few years ago but can try to help as best I can.
      Thanks, Daisy

  6. Dear Ms Dumas, I read your piece in GW (The In-betweeners) with interest, as I am transgendered and spend a large part of my life trying to help other transgendered people. I agree that there are people who regret having undergone gender reassignment, but this is surely inevitable in any complex medical procedure. There have been a number of satisfaction surveys carried out and they show a satisfaction rate uniformly between 87% and 90% (contrast this with another popular medical procedure, stomach banding, where you get a satisfaction rate down around 60%, or you could make the comparison with marriage which also has a satisfaction rate around 60% and dropping). Should those seeking stomach banding or marriage need to see a psychiatrist for one or two years, and live in the desired role for that period or until the gatekeepers say it’s okay to go forward?
    Of course there will be those who find they are disappointed by the process, or who find that life in the new gender role is not the golden dream they expected. But if they have investigated the process as thoroughly as they can and still decide to go ahead it is rather captious to try and blame the professionals who have made your dreams come true. And if you find that matters have not turned out as you wish, surely you live with the outcome of your considered decisions. This is called being an adult.
    Are there more transwomen than transmen? Professionals point out that the ratios have been becoming closer over the years and may very well finish up at parity. A significant number of transmen go through a stage of being butch lesbians, just as many transwomen go through a stage of being transvestites.
    I would not believe a word Alan Finch says. He cheated his way into the Monash program and when he attained reassignment he wrote an ecstatic article in _Women’s Day_ in which he praised the system and said how happy he was and how he planned to marry and would fight for the rights of transgender women. Nowadays he suggests that he was virtually trapped into having the operation and was appalled to wake from his anaethetic and find the operation had been carried out.
    Finally, “Cecile Stuart” is a friend of mine but I have lost touch with her. Could you ask her to contact me? I wrote to her at Christmas but have not heard back so I assume she has moved from what was her marital home. I would very much like to be back in touch.
    Regards, Katherine Cummings

  7. Francesca says:

    Hi

    Can you email me ? I am a teacher in SA and would like to do something to help after reading your article about aunty who runs the bus service in Kununarra WA. Sorry I’m quickly writing this I hope you read this.

  8. David Fox says:

    Hi Daisy,
    I was visiting Sydney a few months ago and clipped your article “Nightclubs close their doors and Kings Cross reels in changing times”. I just found it and shared it with my uncle Peter Harries from Perth, and he wrote this in response…thought you might enjoy. You can find him
    Hi! David,

    What great news! The Cross may go back to that which existed in the 1950’s when it was the most
    densely populated square mile in the British Empire. A truly bohemian, multi-cultural precinct, without
    petty criminals (the Big Boys kept the rubbish OUT), public vice (no street-walkers, but sold sex was available
    in Palmer Street, actually Chapel Lane) where it was safe to stroll at any time of the day or night (except for
    New Years Eve when I went up to the 6th floor apartment of a gay friend in Darlinghurst Road, to pour buckets
    of water on the assembled throng on the closed-off road! There were a few restaurants like The Kookaburra
    open until 6 a.m., The Astoria, The Fish Cafe, The Spaghetti Bar, The Goulash Bar, The Steak House, The Hong Kong
    in Victoria Street was the only Chinese, The Hasty Tasty at the top of William Street (opened in 1955, by a high
    ranking Councillor, who dropped the front door key down the drain outside, as a token that it was to be a 24 hour
    opening place, never to close its doors) I cooked hamburgers in the window on the street for a while in 1958,
    12 midnight till 6 a.m.,). There were only a few coffee lounges The Arabian opposite Springfield Avenue, The Kashmir
    opposite the Rex Hotel (the Saloon Bar was called The Gay Bar and always filled with members of that Society)
    and the Mexican Inn opposite the Metro Theatre in Llankelly Place. Drugs were hardly known, but we used to buy
    dexedrine inhalers from the chemist for two shillings and soak them in our black coffee, also about the same price.
    An over-weight girl who worked at the Pharmacy in Springfield Avenue used to supply us with methedrine pills,
    that along with a few large bottles of beer, consumed on Saturday nights used to keep us going all night and half
    of Sunday. They were pure drugs in those days and we suffered no really bad after-effects, although some might
    say that it accounts for some of my aberrations! Before the mentioned Surf City, the premises were The Kings Cross
    picture theatre and there was a small Newsreel Theatre just along the road to the East. There were several “private”
    gambling clubs, operating under police containment (and kick-backs) and it was the Cross that your Dad
    and I loved. In 1983 I nearly bought a one bed-room unit in CAHOORS, one of the posh residentials in the 1950s, into
    the foyer off which I could only peek past the uniformed doorman. I offered $120,000, but the deceased estate’s agent
    gazumped my bid by $10,000 and I baled out! I absolutely loved The Cross and relish the thought that it may once again
    revert to its former glory.

    If you know anybody with newspaper connections, please forward this to them. I worked at the Sydney Morning Herald in
    1957-58 and “moon-lighted” as a sports writer for the Sunday Mirror and Truth on Saturdays.

  9. Jenny Boyle says:

    Hi Daisy,
    Happy New Year to you.
    We’re in Sydney until am staying at Tyler’s .
    Saw your article on NYE fireworks about the Tyler boys.
    I know you’re a busy girl but was wondering if you could spare a little time to catch up for a drink or coffee during the week.
    We’d love to see you & have a chat about what your up to in life.
    Contact me on 0468 522 788 or jenny.boyle1958@bigpond.com
    Look forward to hearing from you.
    Cheers 😀👍🏻❤️

  10. Aaron says:

    Dear Daisy,

    I’m commenting on your article in The Age
    about the new study on brain cancer from mobile phones.

    I think that the article is not balance and relying only on the study conducted by professor Chapman and
    against the claims made by Dr Devra Davis from US.

    To have a balanced article you should also interview and seek the comments from the brain surgeons like Dr Charlie Teo and A/Professor Vini Khurana, both claim that mobile phones contributing to brain cancer.

    I also recommend you to read the fine print from mobile phone user manuals including the warnings inside mobile phone data, advising phone users to keep the phone away from the body, between 5mm to 20mm, to reduce RF exposure.
    You should ask the telecos why they’re not advising mobile phone users in bold big letter at point of sale
    and on the mobile phone boxes.

    In US a few states the new laws imposing on the
    mobile phone service providers and mobile phone retail outlets to advise costumers about the warning.
    Everyone has the right to know and make his own decision.

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